This Week in L.A. Art

  • The Jules Bates “Artrouble” Center Sorts Out a Legacy
    by Shana Nys Dambrot on July 29, 2021 at 3:01 pm

    Photographer Jules Bates and the creative collective Artrouble were responsible for some of the most emphatic, energetic and indelible images of L.A.’s music, art and fashion nexus, encapsulating the exuberance of the punk into new wave scene circa 1980, and foreshadowing in their rampant interdisciplinary extravagance the collaborative zeitgeist of today. Before he died at The post The Jules Bates “Artrouble” Center Sorts Out a Legacy appeared first on LA Weekly.

  • ARTROUBLE: Julius Xavier Bates
    by David Nathan Allen on July 29, 2021 at 5:37 am

    Special to the L.A. Weekly, a remembrance of Jules Bates by friend and collaborator, and Artrouble co-founder, on the occasion of the establishment of the Jules Bates “Artrouble” Center at ArtCenter College of Design. I had been living in Hollywood for about a year in 1977. I drove a ’63 Impala, was recently married, on The post ARTROUBLE: Julius Xavier Bates appeared first on LA Weekly.

  • L.A. Art Week: Arts Calendar July 28 – August 4
    by Shana Nys Dambrot on July 28, 2021 at 3:00 pm

    Ready or not, it’s officially in-person art fair summer, and along with the yin and yang of Felix and the LA Art Show, scores of galleries are getting in on the action with regional mapped out evenings beginning Wednesday. For those craving a less hectic schedule, the library is streaming blue humor by funny women, The post L.A. Art Week: Arts Calendar July 28 – August 4 appeared first on LA Weekly.

  • Vanessa McConnell: LithosphereOnline August 12—October 10, 2021
    by Jamie Costa on July 26, 2021 at 5:51 pm

    The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) and the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery (LAMAG) are pleased to present the first institutional solo exhibition by Los Angeles artist Vanessa McConnell.    Presented online, Lithosphere features a selection of paintings, works on paper, and related objects. Taking its title from a geological term describing the Earth’s uppermost layer, the exhibition focuses on the layered power of expression and materiality inherent in McConnell’s artistic practice. The most widely known feature of the Earth’s lithosphere are the tectonic plates – revered for their ability to alter the surface of the planet. Similarly, McConnell’s expertise lies in creating two-dimensional works where the surface expresses her ability to manipulate color and form into seemingly new, three-dimensional forms.    McConnell’s paintings are characterized by their thick impasto surfaces, intense colors, and decisive brushstrokes. The artist experiments with a range of tones and techniques, including masking, acrylics, watercolors, and, sometimes, found objects – often working on a single painting for months at a time.    During her labor-intensive process, McConnell adds multiple layers of acrylic paint to develop densely textured and pigmented compositions. The bold aesthetic of McConnell’s work is also, in part, determined by the physical limits of her medium, as the artist continues to use her brushes until they are too heavy with paint to be manipulated. The dramatic, expressive nature of her mark-making, which sometimes leads to tears and rips in the paper, evinces the artist’s powerful compulsion to paint.    About the Artist   Vanessa McConnell (b.1960, Houston, TX, lives and works in Los Angeles, CA) began her practice at the Exceptional Children’s Foundation (ECF) Art Centers in 1983 at the MLK studio in South Los Angeles, and now works from the ECF Art Center Westside studio located in Inglewood, CA. The ECF Art Center Westside is one of ECF’s five progressive art studios supporting adult artists with developmental disabilities.  Artwork image captions:   Untitled, acrylic, mixed media on wood panel, 25 x 20 inches. courtesy of the artist and ECF Art Centers. Untitled, acrylic, mixed media on wood panel, 28 x 18.5 x 1 inches. courtesy of the artist and ECF Art Centers. Untitled, acrylic, string, steel and plastic on canvas, 24 x 18 inches, 2017. courtesy of the artist and ECF Art Centers. Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 6 x 2.5 inches. courtesy of the artist and ECF Art Centers. Untitled, paint on apron, 36 x 28 inches. courtesy of the artist and ECF Art Centers.

  • How Frank Frazetta Won the Game of Thrones, Half a Century Ago
    by R.C. Baker on July 26, 2021 at 5:24 pm

    They beckoned from paperback spinner racks: fur-clad warriors scything through their enemies with bloody broad axes; near-naked women, serene in sorcerous wisdom more menacing than mere muscle or steel. Beginning in the 1960s, painter Frank Frazetta envisioned battles between wizards and warlords, demons and knights, beauties and beasts — epic clashes set in gloomy temples, The post How Frank Frazetta Won the Game of Thrones, Half a Century Ago appeared first on LA Weekly.

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